Man-Booker Prize

I spent two years living in England and fell in love with the people and my city (LEEDS!).  While over there I started reading ‘home-grown’ literature and enjoyed it, the same way I enjoy reading Southern Fiction.  I also discovered the Man Booker Prize and as I love lists, and this is one of the most prestigious awards within the literary community, I decided I wanted to read the winners of the prize.

According to Wikipedia, established in 1969,

The Man-Booker Prize is a literary prize awarded each year for the best original full-length novel, written in the English language by a citizen of the Commonwealth of Nations, Ireland or Zimbabwe.  The winner of the Man Booker Prize is generally assured of international renown and success and, for this reason, the prize is of great significance for the book trade.  It is also a mark of distinction to be nominated for the Man Booker long list or selected for inclusion on the shortlist.

Those books listed under the year are shortlisted books that I want to read.  I’m not sure I’ll ever get around to reading all of them, but it would be neat (there are all sorts of Booker reading challenges out there).

    • 1969 – Something to Answer For, PH Newby
    • 1970 – The Elected Member, Bernice Rubens
    • 1970* – Troubles, JG Farrell (See Wikipedia for the reason for this)
    • 1971 – In a Free State, VS Naipaul
      • Briefing for a Descent into Hell, Doris Lessing (shortlist)
    • 1972 – G, John Berger
    • 1973 – The Siege of Krishnapur, JG Farrell
    • 1974 – The Conservationist, Nadine Gordimer – Holiday, Stanley Middleton
    • 1975 – Heat and Dust, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
    • 1976 – Saville, David Storey
    • 1977 – Staying On, Paul Scott
    • 1978 – The Sea, The Sea, Iris Murdoch
    • 1979 – Offshore, Penelope Fitzgerald
    • 1980 – Rites of Passage, William Golding
      • The Beggar Maid, Alice Munro (shortlist)
    • 1981 – Midnight’s Children, Salman Rushdie
      • The Sirian Experiments, Doris Lessing (shortlist)
    • 1982 – Schindler’s Ark, Thomas Keneally
    • 1983 – Life & Times of Michael K, JM Coetzee
    • 1984 – Hotel du Lac, Anita Brookner
    • 1985 – The Bone People, Keri Hulme
      • - The Good Terrorist, Doris Lessing (shortlist)
    • 1986 – The Old Devils, Kingsley Amis
      • The Handmaids Tale, Margaret Atwood (shortlist)
    • 1987 – Moon Tiger, Penelope Lively
    • 1988 – Oscar and Lucinda, Peter Carey
      • The Satanic Verses, Salman Rushdie (shortlist)
    • 1989 – The Remains of the Day, Kazuo Ishiguro
      • The Cat’s Eye, Margaret Atwood (shortlist)
    • 1990 – Possession: A Romance, AS Byatt
    • 1991 – The Famished Road, Ben Okri
    • 1992 – The English Patient, Michael OndaatjeSacred Hunger, Barry Unsworth
    • 1993 – Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, Roddy Doyle
    • 1994 – How Late It Was, How Late, James Kelman
      • The Folding Star, Alan Hollinghurst (shortlist)
    • 1995 – The Ghost Road, Pat Barker
    • 1996 - Last Orders, Graham Swift
      • Alias Grace, Margaret Atwood (shortlist)
    • 1997 – The God of Small Things, Arundhati Roy
    • 1998 – Amsterdam, Ian McEwan
    • 1999 – Disgrace, JM Coetzee
    • 2000 – The Blind Assassin, Margaret Atwood
    • 2001 – True History of the Kelly Gang, Peter Carey
      • Atonement, Ian McEwan (shortlist)
    • 2002 – Life of Pi, Yann Martel
    • 2003 – Vernon God Liddle, DBC Pierre
    • 2004 – The Line of Beauty, Alan Hollinghurst
    • 2005 – The Sea, John Banville
    • 2006 – The Inheritance of Loss, Kiran Desai
    • 2007 – The Gathering, Anne Enright
    • 2008 – The White Tiger, Aravind Adiga
    • 2009 – Wolf Hall, Hilary Mantel
    • 2010 – The Finkler Question, Howard Jacobson
    • 2011 – The Sense of an Ending, Julian Barnes
      • The Stranger’s Child, Alan Hollinghurst (longlist)
    • 2012 – Bring Up the Bodies, Hilary Mantel
      • The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, Rachel Joyce (longlist)
    • 2013 - The Luminaries, Eleanor Catton
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