Four Years: Part 1 – My Reflection

2014 07-12 Museum SelfieAs I said in my day-of anniversary post, it’s hard to believe I’ve been doing this for four years. You’ll have to forgive this week as it’s going to be even MORE self-centered than usual. Don’t worry, I will go into the numbers later in the week! There were so many when I was looking at them it was overwhelming. As each year passes it’s more and more amazing to see who I interact with and who visits my little spot on the internet, but more on that Wednesday.

This post is a quick post to reflect on how it’s been to blog, specifically about books, for so long. Rather than taking ANOTHER selfie, I just reused the same one (above) I’ve used twice this month already. Thankfully it really fits with my thoughts on the blog. Every post I make is like one of those pieces of mirror in the photo. Each mirror/post gives you a tiny glimpse of who I am and even if you put them all together you don’t get a complete picture, but a mirage/collage of who I am. (Deep right?) Click here to continue reading.

About these ads

Another Year Has Gone By

Four YearsI interrupt my regularly scheduled Monday/Wednesday/Friday posts to announce TODAY is my four-year blogoversery! And with that in mind I’m planning to take the week off from responding to books, my weekly posts and what not and look back on the past four years!

It really is hard to believe that four years ago today I started my little corner of the internet. I’ve had blogs before and most of them I abandoned pretty quickly, but this one stuck.  I honestly thought I’d last two-to-three years and abandon, it but I guess when you write for yourself and not for an audience you stick with things longer than you would imagine!

Click here to continue reading.

Culture Corner – July 2014

2014 07-12 Hodges OverviewLast weekend I had an amazing weekend. I won’t go into details, it was sickeningly adorable, but suffice to say it was a great weekend. Thanks to my roommate I had two tickets to the ICA Boston that he got through work and gave to me and I finally found time to check it out again.

If you’re at all familiar with the blog, or with me, you’ll know I’m not usually impressed with the ICA. (You can read my rant about most museums here.) The building is architecturally fascinating, but the space usage leaves much to be desired. When you add in the super hipster and uppity staff (seriously, I get they love their jobs and more power to them, but you can love your job and interests without being obnoxious) and the over-staffing of the exhibits and the overpriced everything in their gift shop (really, who charges $2+ for postcards – no other museum I’ve ever been to). I even had a membership at one point, but after a couple of bad visits I cancelled it and I’m still glad I did, but this time I had a surprisingly pleasant visit.

Click here to continue reading.

Book 43: The Bridge Over the River Kwai – Pierre Boulle

Boulle, Pierre, - The Bridge Over the River KwaiAnother great selection from my library’s Books into Movies book group. I’m not the biggest fan of war novels and I wasn’t convinced I would enjoy this one, but the writing was simple and easy to read and the juxtaposition/tension between the captured/surrendered British troops and the British commandos was enough to keep me flipping sides about the bridge throughout!

The book centers around the building of the Burma-Siam railway during World War II and specifically around the building of the bridge over the river Kwai, a fictional river in Thailand. I could not remember which modern country was Siam until this past weekend when we walked past a Thai restaurant called House of Siam! I should probably be embarrassed I couldn’t remember that, but let’s blame it on my American-ness and complete lack of knowledge around most Asiatic countries and cultures.

Click here to continue reading.

Book 42: Her Dark Curiosity (The Madman’s Daughter #2) – Megan Shepherd

Shepherd, Megan - Her Dark Curiosity (The Madman's Daughter #2)It is very rare that a second novel, let alone a middle novel in a trilogy, can surpass the first. In this case, not only has Shepherd done it, she’s surpassed an incredibly well written debut novel with an even more creative, intense and harrowing follow-up. It is NOT a place holder as many middle books are in trilogies and I was incredibly impressed.

Whereas H.G. Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau inspired The Madman’s Daughter, took her inspiration for this novel from Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Doctor Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and I CANNOT wait for the third novel, thankfully it give me time to read the book it’s based on, but I won’t tell you in case you want to read it as it’s revealed in the final pages of this novel.

Click here to continue reading.

The Classics Club – July 2014 Meme

Classics ClubEvery month I wonder if I’m going to keep up with the memes but then I remember that I’ve fallen so far behind on books that I might as well stay active through the memes… Perhaps I’ll read another classic next month, or the month after. I’m in no real rush these days and am enjoying reading whatever I want at the moment.

For July the hosts of The Classics Club have asked members

Have you ever read a biography on a classic author? If so, tell us about it. If you had already read works by this author, did reading a biography of his/her life change your perspective on the author’s writing? Why or why not? // Or, if you’ve never read a biography of a classic author, would you? Why or why not?

Click here to continue reading.

Book 41: One More Thing – B.J. Novak

Novak, B. J. - One More ThingThis was quite possibly the strangest and quirkiest book I’ve read in ages. The majority of it comes from the randomness of the collection of short stories, but a lot of it comes from Novak’s rather odd, but incredibly witty imagination. My friend Caitrin lent me this ages ago and I finally got around to reading it.

The first I heard about it was on the podcast Dinner Party Download where Novak read a few of his short stories and then he was in Boston for a reading and book signing and Caitrin and a few friends went. I didn’t go as I’m super selective over what books I want signed, my bookshelf space is severely limited, but I would definitely go to hear him speak now, having read the book! Doesn’t hurt he’s a local boy from Newton and went to Harvard so even more reason to pay attention (never really followed The Office so wasn’t familiar with him at all).

Click here to continue reading.