About Geoff W

Reading my way through life.

Book 363: Her Best-Kept Secret – Gabrielle Glaser

Glaser, Gabrielle - Her Best Kept SecretMany of you might not know this about me, but when I have a problem that I don’t know how to deal with my first response is to research it as in-depth as possible. That makes it a bit awkward when I blog about everything I read (this is my journal reading journal as much as it is your review site). At the same time it’s great because I get to share interesting books, like Her Best-Kept Secret (Amazon link), that I never would have read. And I force myself to explore and synthesize in-depth a lot of topics.

If you see me on a day-to-day basis you’re aware that someone close to me has a lot of problems with alcohol, it’s kind of obvious they are a “she” based on the book title. In reality, I’m not sure it would’ve mattered if they were a she, because after reading The Irrationality of Alcoholics Anonymous (link to the article) in The Atlantic I knew I wanted to find out more about non Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) programs and I figured Glaser was a great place to start as she mentioned her book in the article.

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Five Year Blogoversery Giveaway Winner!

2015 07-27 Giveaway WinnersWell I’m glad some of you got it together enough to fill out the super easy raffle to win $25 :-P I mean it’s FREE money basically and Amazon sells everything! But kidding aside I’m glad to share something in honor of my five years of blogging at The Oddness of Moving Things.

I’m not sure what either of the winners will pick, but they have diverse interests (outside of reading – shock and horror right?) and I couldn’t be happier to pass along a bit of my blogging happiness and mojo in the form of my five-year giveaway. The two winners are… Click here to find out.

Book 362: Mansfield Park – Jane Austen

Mansfield Park - Jane AustenLucky for you I’ve re-read this for our Jane Austen Book Club, so you get to hear about it again, almost exactly three years after I last read it.

Following Sense and Sensibility (1811) and Pride and Prejudice (1813) this was Austen’s third published novel in 1814 and it is a clear shift away from the whimsy and light previous novels. I talk about this in my last response, but I wonder if this has to do with feedback from the first two novels or if it’s her own personal experience and maturation as an adult. We already know that when Austen published Emma, her fourth work, in 1815 that she was comfortable with sassing her critics. She openly says at the start of Emma that she’s writing a character NO ONE can dislike, because so many people disliked Fanny, or Fanny’s decisions.

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Top 5 Moments in Year 5 (And some stats)

2015 07-16 Top 5 in Year 5I didn’t plan to do a separate post, but I wanted the last post to be focused on thanking the people who comment most and my five-year blogoversery giveaway. So I pulled this half and threw it into a separate post. Plus I got to make a few more graphics :-D

The top portion is the top five things from June 2014 to June 2015 that I felt were highlights of my blogging journey. I tried not to go into too much detail, but I wanted to include enough so that if you’re visiting for the first time you’ve got an idea of what my entire blog is about.

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Five Years and Still F*cking Fabulous (+ A Giveaway)

2015 07-12 Five Year GiveawayYou’ll have to forgive the swear in the title, but I wanted something light to introduce the post! I’m still in shock over continuously blogging for five years! That first half-year back in 2010 was a bit dodgy, but since then I’ve stayed pretty true and consistent to my blogging and reading passions.

Obviously I couldn’t have done this without you, my lovely blog readers and friends. We’ve spent FIVE YEARS hanging out. Many of you I’ve met via book blogging and many of my friends I’ve dragged screaming and kicking into this world (mostly through Come Read with Me). I want to give a special thank you to the top six most recent commenters, based on the 1000 most recent comments. You all really make me want to keep talking about the books and the things that I love:

Of course there are others and I truly appreciate every comment, share and like, but these people are some of the best out there! Now on to what most of you will be here for, my pay-it-forward Five Year Giveaway!

Click here for the Giveaway info!

Book 361: Frankenstein – Mary Shelley

Shelley, Mary - FrankensteinAs with 99% of the Classics I’ve read, I’m wondering what took me so long to read this one! Not only is it under 200 pages, but it’s quick and fascinating read. Add in that Shelley was only 19 when she wrote it and I’m like WHOA. This is my second Classic’s Club book this month, so yay for finally making progress on that again.

As when I read Dracula, I was surprised at how much of Frankenstein’s story (Amazon link) was different from what has become the common perception of Frankenstein and his monster in pop-culture.I am happy to report that my reading of this coincided really well with other books I’ve read that are fan-fiction pieces, like Meghan Shepherd’s A Cold Legacy, and tangentially related books about the authors and their connections like another piece of fan-fiction, like Michael Thomas Ford’s Jane Fairfax Trilogy (Jane Bites Back in particular).

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Book 359: Don Quixote – Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (Part 2)

Cervantes, Miguel - Don QuixoteI did it! I finally finished! After almost exactly a month to the day that I started the infamous Don Quixote I finished it. I recapped Part 1 last week because I knew I would struggle to remember everything in it due to how long it took to just read that part but now I’m ready to recap Part 2!

I thoroughly enjoyed Part 2 of Don Quixote. I didn’t enjoy it for the same reasons as I enjoyed Part 1, but it was as great. I think the biggest difference is Cervantes, if possible, was even MORE aware of his works impact on culture and literature. He took the jibes and teasing in Part 1 and turned them into full-blown sarcasm and satire in Part 2. I think a lot of this is in direct response to the “fake Don Quixote,” published before he could release Part 2 and I talk about that in my Reading Spain, AKA an Homage to Miguel de Cervantes post (about half way through under the Biblioteca Nacional Museo section).

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